Legends of Coaching

TARA VANDERVEER OF STANFORD CHOSEN 2014 JOHN R. WOODEN AWARD® “LEGENDS OF COACHING” RECIPIENT 25 straight NCAA Tournaments, 13-time Pac-12 Coach of the Year

LOS ANGELES (September 25, 2013) –Stanford University Head Women’s Basketball Coach Tara VanDerveer will receive the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor in 2014, Coach Wooden’s granddaughter, Christy Impelman, announced today at the annual Los Angeles Athletic Club Wooden Award Tipoff Luncheon. The award recognizes coaches who exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal integrity.

The “Legends of Coaching” award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999. The honorees are selected based on character, success on the court, graduation rates of student-athletes in their basketball program, coaching philosophy, and identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. The first recipient was Dean Smith of North Carolina. VanDerveer will be recognized, along with the men’s and women’s 2014 John R. Wooden Award winners and the Wooden Award All American teams, at the Los Angeles Athletic Club the weekend of April 11-13, 2014.

“Coach Wooden, always a fan of the women’s game, would have been honored to present this award to Coach VanDerveer,” said Nan Wooden, daughter of John Wooden. “Coach VanDerveer’s coaching record, recognition by her peers, and her athletes’ success in the classroom all speak for themselves.”

VanDerveer led her Stanford teams to five straight Final Fours from 2008-2012, and the Cardinal is the 13- time reigning Pac-12 champion (2001-13), having captured both the regular season and conference tournament titles for the last seven seasons. VanDerveer’s career record in 27 seasons at Stanford is 742-152. Under VanDerveer, Stanford has reached an incredible 25 straight NCAA tournaments, with six consecutive 30-win seasons, 2 NCAA titles (1990 and 1992) and 10 trips to the Final Four. (Note: VanDerveer took a sabbatical in 1995-96, and Stanford reached the Final Four that year as well.)

VanDerveer is a 15-time conference coach of the year (13 Pac-12; 2 Big 10). Prior to Stanford, she spent two years at Idaho, and from 1980-85 at Ohio State, where she led her teams to four 20-win seasons and a top 10 national ranking. Her overall career record stands at 894-203. VanDerveer is six wins away from becoming the fifth women’s coach to win 900 games.

VanDerveer played collegiately at Indiana University, and she is a member of the school’s Hall of Fame. She has also coached at the international level, including guiding the U.S. to the gold medal in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Many of VanDerveer’s assistant coaches and players have gone on to careers as head collegiate coaches and basketball administrators, including Molly Goodenbour (Cal State Dominguez Hills); Charmin Smith and Katy Steding (assistant coaches, Cal); Charli Turner Thorne (Arizona State); Renee Brown (WNBA executive); Bobbie Kelsey (University of Wisconsin) and Jennifer Azzi (USF). VanDerveer’s community involvement started when she was hired by Stanford in 1985; each academic quarter, she has her team select one cause or group in the local community to which it lends support.

VanDerveer is the third women’s coach to receive the Wooden Award Legends of Coaching honor, and the second Stanford coach chosen. Mike Montgomery, now at Cal, was the Legends of Coaching winner while at Stanford in 2004. Kansas and Connecticut are the only two other schools with two Legends of Coaching winners.

Legends of Coaching Honorees
2014 Tara VanDerveer, Stanford
2013 Bill Self, Kansas
2012 Geno Auriemma, Connecticut
2011 Tom Izzo, Michigan State
2010 Billy Donovan, Florida
2009 Rick Barnes, Texas
2008 Pat Summitt, Tennessee
2007 Gene Keady, Purdue
2006 Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
2005 Jim Calhoun, Connecticut
2004 Mike Montgomery, Stanford
2003 Roy Williams, Kansas
2002 Denny Crum, Louisville
2001 Lute Olson, Arizona
2000 Mike Krzyzewski, Duke
1999 Dean Smith, North Carolina
About the John R. Wooden Award

Created in 1976, the John R. Wooden Award is the most prestigious individual honor in college basketball. It is bestowed upon the nation’s best basketball player at an NCAA Division I university who has proven to his or her uLOS ANGELES (September 25, 2013) –Stanford University Head Women’s Basketball Coach Tara VanDerveer will receive the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor in 2014, Coach Wooden’s granddaughter, Christy Impelman, announced today at the annual Los Angeles Athletic Club Wooden Award Tipoff Luncheon. The award recognizes coaches who exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal integrity.

The “Legends of Coaching” award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999. The honorees are selected based on character, success on the court, graduation rates of student-athletes in their basketball program, coaching philosophy, and identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. The first recipient was Dean Smith of North Carolina. VanDerveer will be recognized, along with the men’s and women’s 2014 John R. Wooden Award winners and the Wooden Award All American teams, at the Los Angeles Athletic Club the weekend of April 11-13, 2014.

“Coach Wooden, always a fan of the women’s game, would have been honored to present this award to Coach VanDerveer,” said Nan Wooden, daughter of John Wooden. “Coach VanDerveer’s coaching record, recognition by her peers, and her athletes’ success in the classroom all speak for themselves.”

VanDerveer led her Stanford teams to five straight Final Fours from 2008-2012, and the Cardinal is the 13- time reigning Pac-12 champion (2001-13), having captured both the regular season and conference tournament titles for the last seven seasons. VanDerveer’s career record in 27 seasons at Stanford is 742-152. Under VanDerveer, Stanford has reached an incredible 25 straight NCAA tournaments, with six consecutive 30-win seasons, 2 NCAA titles (1990 and 1992) and 10 trips to the Final Four. (Note: VanDerveer took a sabbatical in 1995-96, and Stanford reached the Final Four that year as well.)

VanDerveer is a 15-time conference coach of the year (13 Pac-12; 2 Big 10). Prior to Stanford, she spent two years at Idaho, and from 1980-85 at Ohio State, where she led her teams to four 20-win seasons and a top 10 national ranking. Her overall career record stands at 894-203. VanDerveer is six wins away from becoming the fifth women’s coach to win 900 games.

VanDerveer played collegiately at Indiana University, and she is a member of the school’s Hall of Fame. She has also coached at the international level, including guiding the U.S. to the gold medal in the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta.

Many of VanDerveer’s assistant coaches and players have gone on to careers as head collegiate coaches and basketball administrators, including Molly Goodenbour (Cal State Dominguez Hills); Charmin Smith and Katy Steding (assistant coaches, Cal); Charli Turner Thorne (Arizona State); Renee Brown (WNBA executive); Bobbie Kelsey (University of Wisconsin) and Jennifer Azzi (USF). VanDerveer’s community involvement started when she was hired by Stanford in 1985; each academic quarter, she has her team select one cause or group in the local community to which it lends support.

VanDerveer is the third women’s coach to receive the Wooden Award Legends of Coaching honor, and the second Stanford coach chosen. Mike Montgomery, now at Cal, was the Legends of Coaching winner while at Stanford in 2004. Kansas and Connecticut are the only two other schools with two Legends of Coaching winners.

Legends of Coaching Honorees
2014 Tara VanDerveer, Stanford
2013 Bill Self, Kansas
2012 Geno Auriemma, Connecticut
2011 Tom Izzo, Michigan State
2010 Billy Donovan, Florida
2009 Rick Barnes, Texas
2008 Pat Summitt, Tennessee
2007 Gene Keady, Purdue
2006 Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
2005 Jim Calhoun, Connecticut
2004 Mike Montgomery, Stanford
2003 Roy Williams, Kansas
2002 Denny Crum, Louisville
2001 Lute Olson, Arizona
2000 Mike Krzyzewski, Duke
1999 Dean Smith, North Carolina
About the John R. Wooden Award

Created in 1976, the John R. Wooden Award is the most prestigious individual honor in college basketball. It is bestowed upon the nation’s best basketball player at an NCAA Division I university who has proven to his or her university that he or she is making progress toward graduation and maintaining a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA. Previous winners include Larry Bird (’79), Michael Jordan (’84), Tim Duncan (’97), and last year’s recipients, Brittney Griner of Baylor and Trey Burke of Michigan.

Since its inception, the John R. Wooden Award has contributed nearly one million dollars to universities’ general scholarship fund in the names of the All American recipients and has sent more than 1,000 underprivileged children to week-long college basketball camps. Additionally, the John R. Wooden Award partners with Special Olympics Southern California (SOSC) each year to host the Wooden Award Special Olympics Southern California Basketball Tournament. The day-long tournament brings together Special Olympics athletes and the All American players and coaches in attendance. It is hosted at The Los Angeles Athletic Club during the John R. Wooden Award weekend.

The Legends of Coaching Award will be presented at the 38th Annual Wooden Award Gala Celebration, which will take place the weekend of April 11-13, 2014.


Kansas’ Bill Self Named 2013 John R. Wooden Award “Legends Of Coaching” Recipient

University of Kansas Head Basketball Coach Bill Self will be awarded the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor in 2013, Coach Wooden’s daughter, Nan Wooden Muehlhausen, announced today at the annual Los Angeles Athletic Club Wooden Award Tip-off Luncheon. The award recognizes coaches who exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal integrity.

The “Legends of Coaching” award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999.  The first recipient was Dean Smith of North Carolina. The honorees are selected based on character, success on the court, graduation rates of student-athletes in their basketball program, coaching philosophy, and identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. Self will be recognized, along with the men’s and women’s 2013 John R. Wooden Award winners and the Wooden Award All American teams, at the Los Angeles Athletic Club the weekend of April 11-13, 2013.

Greg Wooden, Coach Wooden’s grandson, stated: “Coach Wooden would have been honored to present this award to Coach Self in recognition not only of his coaching excellence, but also his character and commitments off the court.”

One of the nation’s most successful coaches, Self has won eight-straight Big 12 regular season titles and five league tournament championships in his nine seasons with the Jayhawks. His KU record stands at 269-53 and his 83.5 winning percentage at Kansas is the highest in the legendary program. Overall, Self is in his 19th season as a head coach with a 476-158 (.751 percent) record. Self’s NCAA Tournament success includes a run to the national title game a year ago and an NCAA title in 2008. His Kansas teams have reached at least the Sweet 16 six times in his nine years at KU.

Prior to taking the helm at Kansas, Self served as the head coach at Illinois and Tulsa, where he led both schools to the Elite Eight. Self began his career as an assistant coach for Larry Brown at Kansas and he also served under Leonard Hamilton and Eddie Sutton at Oklahoma State. His first head coaching job was at Oral Roberts, where he took a team that won six games his first year and transformed it into a 20-win team by his third season; Self then rejuvenated the Tulsa program in the same fashion, taking the Hurricane to back-to-back NCAA appearances in 1999 and 2000.

Away from the court, Self devotes substantial time to his “Assists Foundation,” which directs funds to help children in a variety of ways, including scholarships and grants to school-based, private and public agencies. In the classroom, Kansas has achieved an Academic Progress Rate (APR) score of a perfect 1,000 in each of the last six years under Self. In the Bill Self era, Kansas has had 25 Academic All-Big 12 selections, which is best in the conference, and 26 of 27 four-year players at KU have earned their degrees.

Several of Self’s assistant coaches have gone on to head coaching jobs, including Danny Manning (Tulsa) and Barry Hinson (Southern Illinois) in 2012. Other former Self assistants and staff members who have reached the Division I head coaching ranks include Scott Sutton (Oral Roberts), Tim Jankovich, Norm Roberts, Billy Gillispie and John Phillips.

Self is the third Big 12 Conference coach to receive the Wooden Award Legends of Coaching honor, and the second Kansas coach chosen. Roy Williams, now at North Carolina, was the Legends of Coaching winner while at Kansas in 2003. Texas’ Rick Barnes was the winner in 2009. Since he replaced Roy Williams at KU nine years ago, Self has won 269 games. No coach in America has won more in this time span and KU’s 197 wins since the 2006-07 season are the most victories ever in a six-year span in NCAA Division I history

 

 

Legends of Coaching Honorees

2013 – Bill Self, Kansas
2012 – Geno Auriemma, Connecticut
2011 – Tom Izzo, Michigan State
2010 – Billy Donovan, Florida
2009 – Rick Barnes, Texas
2008 – Pat Summitt, Tennessee
2007 – Gene Keady, Purdue
2006 – Jim Boeheim, Syracuse
2005 – Jim Calhoun, Connecticut
2004 – Mike Montgomery, Stanford
2003 – Roy Williams, Kansas
2002 – Denny Crum, Louisville
2001 – Lute Olson, Arizona
2000  - Mike Krzyzewski, Duke
1999 – Dean Smith, North Carolina


Tom Izzo, Michigan State Head Coach, To Be Honored as 2011 John R. Wooden Award Legends of Coaching Recipient

Four-time National Coach of the Year Posts One of Nation’s Top Division I Graduation Rates

2010 Tip-Off LuncheonLOS ANGELES (October 13, 2010) – Michigan State University Head Basketball Coach Tom Izzo will be awarded the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor in 2011, Los Angeles Athletic Club President Steve Hathaway announced today.

Coach Izzo begins his 16th year directing the Spartan program and has won six Big Ten Conference regular season titles and has made six Final Four appearances, including in 2010. His team won the NCAA title in 2000, led by a Wooden Award All American that year, Mateen Cleaves.

Izzo will be recognized, along with the men’s and women’s 2011 John R. Wooden Award winners and the Wooden Award All American teams, at the Los Angeles Athletic Club in April, 2011. The “Legends of Coaching” award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999. The first recipient was Dean Smith of North Carolina. The award recognizes coaches who exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal integrity. The honorees are selected based on character, success on the court, graduation rates of student-athletes in their basketball program, coaching philosophy, and identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award.

Coach Izzo has graduated 83% of his players who have completed their eligibility, and posts a career record of 346-164. His teams have appeared in 13 straight NCAA tournaments, where his winning percentage of 74.5% ranks third among active coaches, just behind former Legends of Coaching winners Mike Krzyzewski of Duke and North Carolina’s Roy Williams. Izzo’s 69.6% win percentage for his career in Big Ten games is second all-time among league coaches.

Izzo first came to MSU in 1983 as an assistant coach under legendary Spartan coach Jud Heathcote. Prior to joining the Spartans, he had been an assistant at Northern Michigan, his alma mater, where he was a third-team All-American as a player in 1977.

Known as a teacher as well as a coach, Izzo boasts five former assistants currently guiding their own programs. He is also active charitably with the V Foundation, and with Coaches vs. Cancer. In 2009, he was honored with the Coaches vs. Cancer Champion Award, recognizing his leadership in the fight against cancer.


Texas’ Rick Barnes To Be Honored As 2009

Oct. 9, 2008
LOS ANGELES (October 8, 2008) – University of Texas Basketball Coach Rick Barnes will be given the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor this year, the Award’s chairman, Duke Llewellyn, announced today.

Barnes will be honored along with the 2009 Men’s and Women’s Wooden Award winners and the Wooden Award All-American teams at the Los Angeles Athletic Club in April of 2009. The “Legends of Coaching” Award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999, with the first honor going to Dean Smith of North Carolina.

Barnes has guided Texas to NCAA Tournament appearances in each of his 10 years at the helm of the Longhorn program. In a career that includes four years at Clemson, six years at Providence and one season at George Mason, Barnes boasts an impressive 449-227 (.664) career record in 21 seasons as a collegiate head coach.

He is tied for third on the current consecutive NCAA tournament appearance list at 13, behind former Wooden Legends honorees Lute Olson and Roy Williams. Texas has produced 10 NBA picks under Barnes, including 2008 Wooden Award All-American D.J. Augustin, 2007 Wooden Award winner Kevin Durant and 2003 Wooden Award winner T.J. Ford. Texas is the only school in the nation with two Wooden Award winners in the last six years. With five Sweet 16 appearances in the last seven seasons and Big 12 titles in 2006 and 2008, Barnes has put the UT program among the nation’s elite.


Tennessee’s Pat Summitt to be Given John R. Wooden Award’s ‘Legends of Coaching’ Honor

Oct. 11, 2007
LOS ANGELES – Tennessee Women’s Basketball Coach Pat Summitt, will be given the John R. Wooden Award’s “Legends of Coaching” honor this year, the Award’s chairman, Duke Llewellyn, announced today.

Summitt will be honored along with the 2008 Men’s and Women’s Wooden Award winners, college basketball’s players of the year, and the Wooden Award All-American teams at the Los Angeles Athletic Club on April 12, 2008 in a nationally televised event. The “Legends of Coaching” Award was adopted by the Wooden Award Committee in 1999, with the first honor going to Dean Smith of North Carolina.

Summitt, the first women’s basketball coach to be honored, is collegiate basketball’s all-time winningest coach. In her three decades in orange, Summitt has won 947 games and an unprecedented seven national titles, including the 2007 NCAA crown. Summitt’s teams have played in an incredible 26 consecutive NCAA Sweet 16s, and have won 26 Southeastern Conference regular season and tournament titles, while compiling an all-time record of 947-180 (.840).

Amazingly, all of Summitt’s players since 1976 have done two things: Every Lady Vol player who completed her eligibility at Tennessee played in at least one Final Four, and all have graduated.

The Los Angeles Athletic Club, one of the nation’s finest and oldest private athletic clubs, has hosted the Wooden Award since its inception in 1977. The most prestigious individual honor in college basketball, the Award was founded by The Club’s Senior Vice President Duke Llewellyn, who continues to serve as the its chairman at age 89. The John R. Wooden Award is bestowed upon the nation’s best player at an institution of higher education who has proven to his/her university that he/she is making progress toward graduation and maintaining a cumulative 2.0 GPA. Previous winners include Michael Jordan (’84), Larry Bird (’79), Tim Duncan (’97) and last year’s recipients, Candace Parker of Tennessee and Texas’ Kevin Durant.

The Award will be televised nationally on CBS. The five male and female finalists will be invited to Los Angeles for the ceremony and all finalists will receive a contribution from The Los Angeles Athletic Club for their university’s general scholarship fund. In early January, the midseason top 30 men/20 women will be announced. Tickets for the presentation gala may be obtained by calling The Los Angeles Athletic Club at (213) 625-2211.

The Los Angeles Athletic Club, founded in 1880, is located at 7th and Olive Streets in one of Los Angeles’ landmark buildings. The current facility, built in 1912, has 12 stories and more than 150,000 square feet of space including 72 European-style hotel rooms.


Purdue’s Gene Keady to Receive 2007 John R. Wooden ‘Legends of Coaching’ Award

Oct. 12, 2006
LOS ANGELES – Purdue University’s all time winningest basketball coach, Gene Keady, has been named this year’s recipient of the John R. Wooden “Legends of Coaching” honor, the Award’s chairman and founder, Richard “Duke” Llewellyn, announced today. Keady will join an exclusive group of coaches to receive the Wooden honor including North Carolina’s Dean Smith, Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, Arizona’s Lute Olson, Louisville’s Denny Crum, and last year’s honoree, Syracuse Coach Jim Boeheim.

“Gene is one of the most successful and highly respected coaches in college basketball and we are delighted to present him with our ‘Legend of Coaching’ award,” said Llewellyn. “Gene transformed Purdue into one of college basketball’s elite programs. The character and discipline he builds in his athletes both on and off the court is a representation of the attributes that Coach Wooden advocated throughout his career.”

The Wooden Award Committee adopted the “Legends of Coaching” Award in 1999 to recognize the lifetime achievements of coaches that exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal achievement. When selecting the individual, the Committee considers character, coaching philosophy, graduation rate of his student-athletes, success on the court, and his identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. Keady will receive the award Saturday, April 7, 2007 during the Wooden Award Ceremony at The Los Angeles Athletic Club.

Keady retired in March 2005 after going 512-270 in 25 seasons (1980-2005) with the Purdue Boilermakers. He earned “National Coach of the Year” honors six times (second-most by any coach) and Big Ten coach of the year a record seven times, including three straight years from 1994 to 1996. He coached the Boilermakers to six Big Ten championships and finished in the top 10 of the final Associated Press rankings six times. On an international level, Keady assisted in the selection process for the 1984 and 1988 U.S. Olympic teams and was an assistant coach on the U.S. team that captured the gold medal at the 2000 Olympic Games in Sydney, Australia. In 2005-06 Keady had a brief stint as an assistant coach in the National Basketball Association with the Toronto Raptors.


Jim Boeheim of Syracuse University to receive 2005-2006 John R. Wooden Award Legends of Coaching

Oct 7, 2005
LOS ANGELES – Syracuse University’s men’s head basketball coach, Jim Boeheim, a recent inductee into the basketball Hall of Fame, has been named this year’s recipient of the John R. Wooden “Legends of Coaching” honor, Award Chairman and Founder Richard “Duke” Llewellyn announced today. Boeheim will join an exclusive group of coaches that has received the award, including North Carolina’s Dean Smith, Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, Arizona’s Lute Olson, Louisville’s Denny Crum, and last year’s honoree, UConn coach Jim Calhoun.

“We’re pleased to associate our award with one of the most successful and highly respected coaches in college basketball history,” said Llewellyn. “Coach Boeheim exemplifies all of the qualities of an elite coach, including student-athlete development and on-court success. Over the course of his stellar coaching career, he has consistently demonstrated strong character while upholding the attributes that Coach Wooden advocated throughout his career.”

The Wooden Award Committee adopted the Legends of Coaching Award in 1999 to recognize the lifetime achievements of coaches that exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal achievement. When selecting the individual, the committee considers character, coaching philosophy, student-athlete graduation rates, success on the court, and the coach’s identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. Boeheim will receive the award during the Wooden Award Ceremony on April 8, 2006, at The Los Angeles Athletic Club.

In his 29 seasons at Syracuse (1976-2005), Boeheim has compiled a distinguished 703-241 overall record (75%) while leading the Orangemen to three National Championship games (1987, 1996 and 2003) and a National title (`03). Jim Boeheim’s 2004-05 Syracuse team finished with a 27-7 record, which resulted in its 24th NCAA postseason appearance of his tenure. During the season Boeheim earned his 700th victory, becoming the 18th coach in Division I history to reach the milestone. He ranks fifth among active Division I coaches in winning percentage and is tied for sixth in victories.

A three-time BIG EAST Coach of the Year, Boeheim has been honored as District II Coach of the Year 10 times by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC). In 2001 Boeheim led the USA Basketball Young Men’s Team to the gold medal at the World Championship in Japan, his seventh year of USA Basketball coaching experience. He was named USA Basketball 2001 National Coach of the Year.

Additionally, Boeheim is a former team captain of the Syracuse basketball team, where he helped lead the Orange to a 22-6 record in his senior season. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree in social science, Boeheim played professional basketball with Scranton of the Eastern League. He was a member of two championship squads and earned second-team all-star honors. In 1969 he turned to a career in coaching and was hired as a graduate assistant. Soon he was promoted to a full-time assistant coaching post and was part of the staff that guided the Orangemen to the program’s first Final Four appearance in 1975. A year later he was appointed head coach.

A champion of many charitable causes, Boeheim has been most active with “Coaches vs. Cancer,” a national fundraising organization. He has also lent his time to Crouse Hospital Family Maternity Center, the Children’s Miracle Network, the Make-A-Wish Foundation, the Pioneer Center for the Blind and Disabled, Lighthouse, People in Wheelchairs, Easter Seals, the Special Olympics, the Rescue Mission and the Jack Bruen Fund.

Several athletes under Boeheim’s tutelage have been named Wooden All-Americans, including Rony Seikaly (1988), Sherman Douglas (1989), Derrick Coleman (1990), Billy Owens (1991) and Hakim Warrick (2005).


Stanford’s Mike Montgomery to receive John R. Wooden

October 21, 2003

LOS ANGELES, Calif., — University of Stanford Head Basketball Coach Mike Montgomery, Stanford’s all-time winningest basketball coach, has been named this year’s recipient of the John R. Wooden “Legends of Coaching” honor, the Award’s chairman and founder Richard “Duke” Llewellyn announced today. Montgomery will join an exclusive group of coaches to receive the Wooden honor including North Carolina’s Dean Smith, Duke’s Mike Krzyzewski, Arizona’s Lute Olson, Louisville’s Denny Crum and last year’s honoree, former Kansas Coach and current North Carolina Coach Roy Williams.

“We’re proud to associate our award with one of the most well-respected coaches in college basketball today,” said Llewellyn. “Mike has been instrumental in shaping Stanford into one of college basketball’s elite programs that is consistently ranked among the top in the nation. And above all, he has achieved his on-court success by recruiting quality student-athletes that demonstrate strong character and uphold the attributes that Coach Wooden advocated throughout his career. We look forward to presenting Mike with the `Legends of Coaching’ honor at this year’s Wooden Award ceremony.”

The Wooden Award Committee adopted the “Legends of Coaching” Award in 1999 to recognize the lifetime achievements of coaches that exemplify Coach Wooden’s high standards of coaching success and personal achievement. When selecting the individual, the Committee considers character, coaching philosophy, graduation rate of his student-athletes, success on the court, and his identification with the goals of the John R. Wooden Award. Montgomery will receive the award Saturday, April 10, 2004 during the Wooden Award Ceremony at The Los Angeles Athletic Club.

In 17 years at Stanford (1986-2003), Montgomery has compiled a distinguished 363-165 (.688) record while guiding the Stanford Basketball team to 15 post-season tournament appearances, including the prestigious Final Four in March of 1998, and three consecutive Pac-10 titles in 1999, 2000 and 2001. He boasts an even more impressive 24 winning seasons in his 25 years as a head coach at both Stanford and the University of Montana. Five athletes under Montgomery’s tutelage have been named Wooden All-Americans, including Todd Lichti in 1989, Brevin Knight in 1997, Mark Madsen in 2000, alone with Casey Jacobsen and Jarron Collins in 2001.

Created in 1976, the John R. Wooden Award is the most prestigious individual honor in college basketball. It is bestowed upon the nation’s best player at an institution of higher education who has proven to his university that he is making progress toward graduation and maintaining a cumulative 2.0 GPA. Previous winners include such notables as Michael Jordan (’84), Larry Bird (’79), Tim Duncan (’97) and last year’s recipient, T.J. Ford (’03).

The 2004 Award ceremony, which will include the presentation of the Wooden Award All-American Team, the inaugural Women’s Wooden Award and the presentation of the Legends of Coaching Award, will be held at The Los Angeles Athletic Club on Saturday, April 10, 2004 and will be broadcast live on a CBS telecast.

The men’s and women’s top five finalists will receive a contribution from the John R. Wooden Award Scholarship Fund in their name to their university’s general scholarship fund. The Wooden Award scholarship fund was established in 2002 by Applied Materials and corporate partners through the California Community Foundation (CCF) to honor Coach Wooden’s dedication as an educator. The scholarship fund distributed a total of $75,000 to five universities last year, enabling 23 deserving students to pursue their educational goals. Anyone interested may contribute directly to the scholarship fund through the CCF (www.calfund.org).